All posts by Alan B. Zibluk

Why do Customer Centric Companies Stand Out?

The bottom line is that customer-centric companies stand out. They are more desirable for consumers to do business with and more enjoyable places for employees to work. The top-rated customer service companies are often the best companies to work for as well. The reason is that the culture within the company offers a similar experience to what the customer experiences on the outside. Some things to consider about customer-centric companies:
 
Customer-centric companies empower employees to make decisions that are for the benefit of the customer. They have guidelines versus rules and policies, and the mindset that if what the customer is asking for isn’t illegal or immoral, won’t cost the company money (although sometimes that’s still OK), and won’t harm the company’s reputation, then it should be considered.
 
customer centric companies
 
Customer-centric companies hire people who fit the culture and have personalities that align with the company’s core values, mission and vision. Skills and experience are important, of course, but these high-performing companies are looking for other qualities as well. It takes the right combination of skill, personality, and attitude.
 
Customer-centric companies invest a lot of time and money into soft skills training such as customer service and relationship building. Technical and product training are important, but constant reinforcement of the “people side” of the business is equally important, if not even more so. Customer-centric companies know the importance of their employees, and take a “people first” approach. They develop their people at a level that keeps them engaged and enthusiastic about taking care of the company’s customers.
 
Steven Hodgkiss
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Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

T minus 10 and counting

Update to the Juggernaut launch of MH!

With a very small edit in the 2nd video (Alpha Founder) they are being prepared for final release. Mike Darling will be updating the Alpha Profile pages to have the new video. He will also be upgrading the back office to default to the second Alpha Founder video and the Alpha upgrade page. In other words, unless you are either subscribed to our a fully paid Alpha subscriber or founder, every time you log in that page will default.

Mike Darling will also be building a template capture page to be used on any domain for the new video and we will have it hosted on some of our domains for the big massive email campaign to our old Veretekk database.

Mike and Mariusz are working on our new Admin email system so we can access the millions of name, email, IP, date, phone, etc. so our first launch will go to that database as soon as they finish it. Mike has told me he will try to have it ready by the end of this month.

Vince (the video animation marketing firm we are using) and his copywriters will be crafting our 10 MH auto responders starting next week to complete this campaign.

We are getting very close to heading up up and away!

Thomas Prendergast

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

744 West in West Haven, Connecticut Restaurant Review


I came here Saturday May 2, 2015 around 2:30 pm. I wanted to be close in West Haven as my Dad was in the VA recovering from pneumonia. I was here many years ago and a co-worker recently told me how good this place was. It received many positive Yelp/Trip Advisor reviews so I wanted to check it out for myself.

Their address is 744 Boston Post Road; West Haven, CT 06516. Their telephone number is (203) 934-5726. Below is a picture of their street sign.

Besides giving a review, I want to give my readers a chance to learn more. It is always good to have more than one opinion when you want to dine out.

744 West Bar & Grill
Yelp Reviews
Trip Advisor Reviews

I was by myself and was hoping for a place at the bar. The bar was packed so I went into the dining room. Ariana came out with food for a group and politely said “one moment please”. It was a moment and she promptly took me to a table.

I ordered the “Pepper Jack Cajun Burger”. It is listed as ½ lb angus burger cajun dusted & topped with caramelized onions and melted pepper jack. It was $8.00. I asked for my burger to be cooked “well done, a hockey puck please” and I got what I asked. I want to say fantastic job as my request in other restaurants seem to be difficult to carry out. I detected a little salt on my French Fries which wasn’t a bad thing. Coleslaw way typical. Below are two different pictures of my meal.

This was a good lunch. I still prefer places like Prime 16 and Rudy’s in New Haven for my burger but if I am ever in the neighborhood and want something I know I will like I will come here. The customers around me seemed happy.

I am giving my experience 3.5 stars. Ariana was terrific. Food was good and I love getting what I ask for. Bathroom was small and it had a small line. I am not a fan of the Post Road.

I agree with the positive Yelp and Trip Advisor reviews.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me. Feel free to share (or like) anything I have done on Pinterest with others and feel free to follow me.

Follow Me on Pinterest

All the best,

Alan
Alan Zibluk
http://www.alzibluk.com
e-mail: alan@internetguy.ws

PS: If you are going to blog and want to get noticed, you should use Markethive.
http://www.markethive.com/alzibluk.


Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

MarketHive is much more than just a website for business owners.

MarketHive is much more than just a website for business owners.
 
When I was introduced to Tom Prendergast in October 2012, he told me of a vision he had to provide an advanced online marketing platform to help existing and prospective small business owners build their businesses by providing them with free online marketing tools. 
 
I had no real experience of using the internet to market a business but I shared this vision and decided to become a Founder Member in this project. With other Founder Members, some who have much more internet experience than I do, we were able to raise the funds to develop the project. 
We had not even decided on the name MarketHive at that stage. We knew the project would take approximately two to three years, and now this vision is soon to become a reality. 
MarketHive is currently in a soft launch phase to gather a few members to help us test some of the further development stages before a full launch to the public. 
I am proud to be a part of this project and look forward to seeing many more members in MarketHive soon. 
 
You may not want a business of your own. That's OK. Anyone can have a MarketHive account. You can join MarketHive just to check out the best deals in the products and services being offered by other MarketHive members. 
As a MarketHive member, you can even join or create groups and/or forums based around your personal interests.
…and so much more.
 
Membership is entirely free of charge. There is absolutely nothing to lose by joining MarketHive.

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

I am Watching You

The time has come that the rank and file (That is You) engage in the practice of speaking your mind, belaying you insights, sharing your perspective of what MarketHive means and does and how it serves the little guy and gal out there on the Internet. Go plant the seeds on the forums. HINT: Look up at the banner. It lists many of the top forums. Get your Twitter going! Engage the Markethive Fan page! It is time for organic discussions across the vast wastelands.

I am watching you and taking notes.
 


Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

A Brief History of AJS Motorcycles

AJS motorcycles were first manufactured by the Stevens brothers in Wolverhampton in the late 19th Century.
 
The company was started by four Stevens brothers who’s father Joe was a blacksmith in the Wolverhampton area of the West Midlands. Joe had five sons and it was the four eldest who started in the early years manufacturing proprietary engines and later building frames eventually leading to building complete motorcycles, the first being produced in 1898.
 
ajs motorcycles
 
The company, originally called the Stevens Screw Company, was renamed after taking the name of the only son Jack with two initials becoming the A J Stevens & Co Ltd., the models thus being named AJS.
 
The company was noted for its high quality and were firm believers in competing in speed tests and reliability runs to improve the quality of their products, along with entries in the famous Isle of Man TT races in 1911.
 
As production increased, the brothers, in 1914, moved to new premises at Graisley Hill, Wolverhampton and while many manufacturers of the day, including AJS with an 8hp V twin, changed to twin cylinder models, the Stevens brothers also continued to develop the ever popular single cylinder models.
 
Due to the First World War, the factory was forced into military production which provided the company with valuable expertise in metals and production methods which, after the war, were put to good use in motorcycle production and featured heavily in the new ohv 350cc racer winning the first post war TT in 1920 by a large margin.
 
This was followed up the following year with a Senior TT win with a 350cc Big Port AJS. Many notable victories followed over the years including Jimmie Guthrie’s famous first Isle of Man victory in 1930 on an ohc 250cc AJS. During this time AJS were also very active and successful in various record attempts throughout Europe claiming many world records in the process.
 
The factory was also busy developing new models, while the 350cc Big Port remained a firm favourite along with a twin port 250cc and ever growing in capacity V twin models, new models included a transverse V twin in 1930 while on the racing scene in 1927 an ohc 350cc was developed followed by an ohc 500cc in 1928.
 
Another development in 1928 was a transverse in-line four cylinder using an engine similar in design to that used the Austin 7 but only three or four development bikes were ever built and never went into full production. Thankfully one of these surviving versions can be seen in the Sammy Miller Museum at New Milton Hants.
 
The company also looked at manufacturing other products from wireless sets, motor cars and heavy commercial vehicles. However, during all this costs started to get out of control and when in 1931 there was a massive downward trend in the sale of motor vehicles the company was in financial trouble and had no option but to close factory and go into liquidation. The brothers were proud of the fact that in the fullness of time every creditor was repaid in full and to the last penny.
 
The company and all its assets was purchased by the London company H Collier & Sons Ltd, manufacturers of the Matchless motorcycles who kept the AJS name and continued to produce models pretty much as they finished with the Collier Brothers forming a new company called Associated Motorcycles Ltd.
 
AJS models were promoted through the various aspects of competition developing a number of multi cylinder road racing models including the 500cc V four, initially as air cooled racer followed by water cooling and turbo. As in the Wolverhampton days reliability trials continued to play a large part in the development of their models. Another model developed in Wolverhampton.
 
After World War II the production range was gradually merged with the Matchless range becoming badge engineering of both brands with a range of 250, 350 & 500cc ohv singles along with twin cylinder models from 500 – 750cc.
 
On the competition front the V four cylinder roadracer was dropped and followed by a 500cc twin famously known as the Porcupine due to cooling fins around the head and cylinders, initially with a turbo charger which was later dropped because of rule changes in the sport. The off road competition also developed with a very successful production based 350cc trials and 500cc (motor cross) scrambler supplied under both brand names. They also developed in the mid sixty’s a two stroke bike for motor cross called the Stormer using the Villiers 250cc Starmaker engine.
 
The Porcupine originally designed proved to be not very successful and was dropped in favour of a of a production based 500cc twin but was soon dropped in favour of a brace of ohc 350cc and 500cc singles these being the AJS 7R and Matchless G50. These machines enjoyed major successes and provided the back bone from the 1940s through to the late 1960s both in Grand Prix and the domestic road racing scene.
 
Sadly in 1967 AMC ceased production and was sold off but the AJS name continued being bought by Fluff Brown who continues to produce the Stormer in both 250cc and 370cc versions. The Browns (AJS Motorcycles Ltd) also import under the AJS brand a range of custom and off road type bikes for use on public roads.
 
 
Article written by Roger Limb

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

A Brief History of Douglas Motorcycles

In 1882, the Douglas brothers, William and Edward, formed the Douglas Engineering Company in Kingswood, Bristol to carry out foundry work.
 
Douglas Motorcycles T35 Mk 1 
 
The horizontally opposed twin cylinder (flat twin) engine had originally been designed by German engineer, Karl Benz.
The flat twin engine for which the Douglas company became well known, was designed by Joseph Barter, the founder of Light Motors Ltd.
 
Barter had produced a single-cylinder motorcycle between 1902 and 1904, and then the 200cc flat twin called the Fairy, using components manufactured at the Douglas foundry.
 
Light Motors Ltd. failed in 1907 and was taken over by the Douglas brothers. Barter joined Douglas to continue with motorcycle design.
 
In 1907, the first Douglas motorcycle appeared. It featured a 350cc version of the flat twin and single speed belt drive. One of the cylinders faced forwards whilst the opposing cylinder faced the rear of the motorcycle. Initial sales were not too impressive.
 
In 1910, a two speed gearbox had been introduced, and this improved sales figures.
In 1911, two of three Douglas entries finished in the Isle of Man TT Races.
William Douglas rode one of the machines into seventh place in just over four hours.
G.L. Fletcher came twelfth.
 
1912 was more successful for Douglas in the Isle of Man Junior TT Race.
 
Harry Bashall came first at an average speed of 39.65mph.
 
In second place was Edward Kickham who achieved the fastest lap at 41.76mph.
 
J. Stewart came in fourth position and Jack Haslam came eighth.
 
In 1913, Douglas entered thirteen machines in the Isle of Man Junior TT Race.
 
Seven of these machines finished the race, the best position being W. Newsome who came in second place.
 
In 1914, the best that Douglas could manage in the Junior TT Race was seventh place ridden by E.E. Elwell.
 
Douglas continued to enter the TT Races with some reasonable results.
 
During World War I, Douglas manufactured many motorcycles for military use.
 
By 1920, the range included overhead valve machines 500cc and 733cc, as well as side valve machines of 350cc and 595cc.
 
The 350cc side valve machines were reconditioned military WD models.
 
Also in the 1920s, the RA models were introduced for racing. They featured disc brakes developed at the Research Association.
 
In 1923, production RA models were introduced in 346cc and 596cc versions.
 
The 348cc side valve EW models followed shortly after.
 
TT success returned to Douglas in 1923 when Tom Sheard won the Senior TT. Also in 1923, Douglas won the first ever Isle of Man Sidecar Race with the famous Douglas banking sidecar ridden by Freddie Dixon and T.W. Denny.
 
A Douglas ridden by A.H. Alexander came third in the Junior TT that year.
 
Later in 1923 Jim Whalley won the French Grand Prix on a Douglas.
 
Percy Flook won the gruelling Durban-Johannesburg Race in 1923 riding a 2.75 hp machine. He achieved an average speed of 43 mph over 430 miles.
 
In 1927, both 350cc and 600cc versions of the EW were available and in 1928 a 350cc ohv Sports model based on the EW was introduced.
 
In 1929 came the S5 and S6 models, developed by the well known motorcycle racer and tuner, Freddie Dixon.
Another Dixon design, the 350cc A31 followed in 1930.
In 1931, the overhead valve K32 and M32 models were introduced.
In 1932, after twenty five years of motorcycle production, Douglas became a limited company known as Douglas Motors Ltd.
 
They were to continue manufacturing motorcycles for a further twenty five years.
 
In 1934, the Blue Chief and the Endeavour, a 494cc flat twin shaft drive model were introduced.
By 1935, the company was struggling financially and was taken over by by the British Aircraft Company (BAC) who then formed a new company, Aero Engines Ltd.
 
The company continued to manufacture side valve 350cc, 500cc and 600cc models up to the breakout of World War II.
Motorcycle production continued into World War II and for the war effort, the company manufactured a variety of products including generators, aircraft components and industrial engines.
 
In 1945, the T35 was introduced featuring a 350cc flat twin engine with chain drive.
In 1946, the company became known as Douglas (Kingswood) Ltd.
In 1948, not long after the war, Douglas was facing financial difficulty again and production was restricted to the 350cc flat twin models.
 
In the early 1950s, Douglas became the UK importer and constructor of the Piaggio Vespa scooters.
In 1955, the 350cc Douglas Dragonfly was introduced. This was the last motorcycle to be produced by Douglas.
The Dragonfly featured a 348cc flat twin engine, four speed gearbox and chain drive.
 
In 1957, when Westinghouse Brake and Signal took over Douglas, production of Douglas motorcycles came to an end.
 
The production of the Vespa scooters at the Douglas factory also ended, however the company did continue to assemble scooters from parts imported from Italy.
 
Under Westinghouse, Douglas continued to sell Piaggio scooters and when Piaggio acquired the Gilera motorcycle brand in 1969, Douglas also became the UK importer for Gilera.
 
This continued through until 1982 when the import licence came to an end.
 
Steven Hodgkiss

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

Why Become a MarketHive Alpha Founder?

MarketHive will be released to the public very soon. It is currently in a soft launch phase.

During this soft launch phase, there is the opportunity to become a MarketHive Alpha Founder.

What is MarketHive, what is meant by soft launch and what is an Alpha Founder?

MarketHive is a powerful inbound marketing system and worldwide Social Neural Networking community for home based business owners and customers alike. It is also designed to help those seeking an opportunity to start their own business.
Funded with almost $500,000 raised by the original Founder Members, MarketHive has been developed over the last 2 years by Tom Prendergast who has over 25 years internet marketing experience.

MarketHive will offer an extensive range of advanced marketing tools entirely free of charge to every member. Imagine a system that will help people run their existing business, or start a new business, without the worry of how much the marketing tools will cost.

As MarketHive membership grows, its income will come from advertising.
Advertising will be optional. No member will be under any obligation to place any ads.

Do you think a system offering free tools and no obligation to pay for any advertising will attract many members?

The soft launch phase is where the developers and original Founder Members of MarketHive are carrying out some final testing before full release to the public… and also where Alpha Founder positions are being offered to those wishing to share in the future success of MarketHive.

By making a commitment to contribute a one time payment of $1200 to the marketing campaign, each Alpha Founder will receive a lifetime profit share of the MarketHive advertising revenue.

Think about that very carefully. A lifetime profit share for around the same cost of a daily cup of coffee for one year.

You do not need to understand internet marketing to be an Alpha Founder. However, if you do wish to use the potential of MarketHive to build a business, there will be many benefits such as ad credits for life and much more.

There will be a total of 1,000 Alpha Founder positions. Some have already been taken.

If you are interested in becoming an Alpha Founder, or if you need more information, please send an email stating Alpha Founder in the subject line to paulgmercer@gmail.com. 

You can, of course, sign up for your free MarketHive account by going to markethive.com/paulmercer and log in using one of your social networks. The account will be limited to certain functions as MarketHive is still in the soft launch phase.

#markethive

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

Dew Drop Inn in Derby, Connecticut Restaurant Review


I am happy that MarketHive is now in Alpha Promotion Mode. I know this blog post will be shared so I need to get back to writing. If you are interested in learning more please check out my website at http://www.markethive.com/alzibluk. You need to sign up with one of your social media accounts.

One of my favorite places to go is the Dew Drop Inn in Derby, Connecticut. Their address is 25 North Avenue, Derby, CT 06418. Telephone is (203) 735-7757. Below is a picture of the outside of the Dew Drop Inn as well as my first lunch there on Saturday April 19, 2014. It was the Rodeo Burger which is described as “Cheddar Cheese, Onion Rings, Bacon and BBQ Sauce.

Besides giving a review, I want to give my readers a chance to learn more. It is always good to have more than one opinion when you want to dine out.

Dew Drop Inn
Yelp Reviews
Trip Advisor Reviews

On my second visit I had the Blue Goat which is described as “Goat Cheese, Cucumbers, Mixed Greens and creamy blueberry dressing”. My third visit I brought my girlfriend from Ireland with me. We both shared the Fried Mozzarella Sticks and Jalapeno Poppers. Both were good and we both enjoyed them. Sorry no pictures for these. I told different people about my three visits and the one thing I constantly heard from different people was “you haven’t tried their wings yet”.

Since then I have had five different wings. I am listing them below in order of which ones I liked the most. My two favorites are the Cajun BBB and JD BBQ.

My third and fourth favorites were the Jim Bean Bourbon BBQ and General Tsao’s.

The last one I tried was the Spicy Ranch & Bacon ones. These were a little to rich for me. These would have been perfect to share with someone.

The staff at Dew Drop Inn are excellent. I like the customers. Some of the customers can be loud when they come in but will also say excuse me if they accidently bump into me on the way to the bathroom. One time there was this nice couple who brought in bread and was insistent that I had a piece.

I was born in Derby, Connecticut and I have loyalty to it. It is the smallest city in the State of Connecticut. I have found two hidden gems in this small city. One is Roseland Apizza and the other is the Dew Drop Inn.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me. Feel free to share (or like) anything I have done on Pinterest with others and feel free to follow me.

Follow Me on Pinterest

All the best,

Alan
Alan Zibluk
http://www.alzibluk.com
e-mail: alan@internetguy.ws


Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member

Just What Is A Social Network?

Social networking is the grouping of individuals into specific groups, like small rural communities or a neighbourhood subdivision, if you will.  Even though social networking is possible in person, especially in the workplace, universities, and high schools, it is most popular online. 
 
This is because unlike most high schools, colleges, or workplaces, the internet is filled with hundreds of thousands of individuals who are looking to meet other people, to gather and share first-hand information and experiences about cooking, golfing, gardening, developing friendships professional alliances, finding employment, business-to-business marketing and even groups sharing with us information about baking cookies to the Thrive Movement.  The topics and interests are as varied and rich as the story of our universe. 
 
When it comes to online social networking, websites are commonly used. These websites are known as social sites. Social networking websites function like an online community of internet users. Depending on the website in question, many of these online community members share common interests in hobbies, religion, politics and alternative lifestyles. Once you are granted access to a social networking website you can begin to socialize. This socialization may include reading the profile pages of other members and possibly even contacting them. 
 
The friends that you can make are just one of the many  benefits to social networking online. Another one of those benefits includes diversity because the internet gives individuals from all around the world access to social networking sites. This means that although you are in the United States, you could develop an online friendship with someone in Denmark or India. Not only will you make new friends, but you just might learn a thing or two about new cultures or new languages and learning is always a good thing. 
 
As mentioned, social networking often  involves grouping specific individuals or entities together. While there are a number of social networking websites that focus on particular interests, there are others that do not. The websites without a main focus are often referred to as “traditional” social networking websites and usually have open memberships. This means that anyone can become a member, no matter what their hobbies, beliefs, or views are. However, once you are inside this online community, you can begin to create your own network of friends and eliminate members that do not share common interests or goals. 
 
As I’m sure you’re aware, there are dangers associated with social networking including data theft and viruses, which are on the rise. The most prevalent danger though often involves online predators or individuals who claim to be someone that they are not. Although danger does exist with networking online, it also exists in the real world, too. Just like you’re advised when meeting strangers at clubs and bars, school, or work — you are also advised to proceed with caution online. 
 
By being aware of your cyber-surroundings and who you are chatting to, you should be able to safely enjoy social networking online. It will take many phone conversations to get to know someone, but you really won’t be able to make a clear judgment until you can meet each other in person.  Just use common sense and listen to your inner voice; it will tell you when something doesn’t feel right about the online conversations taking place. 
 
If you’ve updated your Facebook status, posted photos of last night’s party to Flickr for your friends to see or made a business contact through LinkedIn, then you’ve used a social networking site. But what exactly is a social networking site? What are the key attributes that set it apart from other Web sites? How do they allow people to form online communities and share social networking information? 
 
Some of the earliest sites that we would recognize as being similar to today’s social networking sites appeared in the mid 1990s, when the Internet started growing in appeal. These early sites focused on letting users hook up with people they had known in the past, or finding out how they were connected to other site users. 
 
Friendster appeared in 2002 and followed a similar model, but it offered additional features like photo sharing and it quickly became the first of the “big” social networking sites. Since then, however, Friendster has declined in popularity and is no longer one of the top 20 social networking sites in the United States [source: Hitwise]. After Friendster came MySpace and Facebook, along with sites like Bebo, Hi5, Orkut and Yahoo! 360. In addition, dozens of sites catering to very specific regions or tastes have sprung up. Whether you’re interested in books, video games, music or meeting people from Denmark, there’s probably a social networking site for you. 
 
The idea of an online community goes back much farther than the 1990s, however. Very early forms of the Internet were used to foster social networks. The earliest online communities were dial-up bulletin-board systems (BBSes) such as The Well and numerous other regional systems. While these early communities did not have the features users have come to expect of modern social networking sites, they shared the core idea of connecting people with common interests. 
 
Once you are well informed and comfortable with your findings, you can begin your search from hundreds of networking communities to join. This can easily be done by performing a standard internet search. Your search will likely return a number of results, including MySpace, FriendWise, #MarketHive, FriendFinder, Yahoo! 360, Facebook, Orkut, and Classmates.
 
For free Inbound Marketing Tools see my main page at Market Hive
 

Alan Zibluk – Markethive Founding Member